Snacking more, so let’s Snack Better!

Let’s face it, we’ve become a snacking nation. It is no longer considered a stigma and no longer considered  “spoiler of appetites”.  Instead it is somewhat thought to be a healthful habit!    Snacks are not always nutritious contributions to the diet. Consumers are snacking more than ever and for several reasons: a pick me up, reward, break during the day, comfort, and simply mindless munching.  People are leaning more toward more healthful snacking in the morning, then shifting to less healthful choices in the evening. As people begin to turn to more frequent snacking, it is important to make food choices that provide essential nutrients in the total diet and to cut down on regular meal sizes. Focus on nutrient-rich options, balanced with a source of protein, fiber, and healthy fats and it becomes a win win solution to...
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Grape Seed Serum

What do you do with it? The following are some uses for keeping your skin healthy by the addition of Grape Seed Serum:       This super oil is not only a natural antioxidant but is 20X more potent than Vitamin C , 50X more powerful than Vitamin E and more potent in Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids than Olive Oil. It is absorbed quickly into the skin leaving your skin silky smooth and not greasy. It is an anti-inflammatory, so accelerates the healing process and improves blood flow to the skin. The most important use for Grape Seed Serum is as a great moisturizer. It is light and absorbs quickly. Your skin will not feel greasy, simply soft and smooth. Additionally, it is a 100% natural antioxidant and you get 100% efficacy into the...
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Nutrition: Don’t Get Burned on Frozen Meals

Since everyone seems to have such busy lives, there are times it is much easier to grab a frozen meal when you need something quick. The following hints may be helpful in your choices: Choose meals with at least 8 grams of protein and 4 grams of fiber. If your frozen meal lacks in vegetables, mix in your favorite vegetable or add a salad or rich-vegetable soup. To boost the nutrient intake, you might add a glass of milk and some fruit. Check the fine print to make sure there are no more than 600 mg. of sodium and 4 grams of saturated...
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Vitamin D

Since we’re beginning to have more daylight and more sun throughout the day, it’s time to think about Vitamin D. Yes, we do need Vitamin D. Do we need to use it topically? What is the best way to get the amount of Vitamin D needed to be healthy? What does it do for us? As far as applying it topically, it is touted that it gives us elasticity, hydration, pore reduction and skin radiance. This may or may not be true. Proper diet will do more for you and since Vitamin D is a fat-soluble (oil) vitamin that is found in very few foods. It is present in the skin of fatty fish (tuna, salmon and mackerel). Small amounts are also found in beef liver and egg yolks in the form of Vitamin D3. There are also supplements in fortified foods such as milk, butter and margarine. Other dairy products such as cheese are not typically fortified. Being Vitamin D deficient is large and medically significant. These issues include improper nail growth, bone density disorders and both kidney and liver dysfunction. Excessive intake of Vitamin D can also cause anorexia, headaches and vomiting to name a few. There are concerns that wearing sunscreen affects our ability to absorb Ultra Violet radiation. This is an extreme diagnosis. Sunscreens do allow some UV radiation to enter the body. It is sunblock (zinc oxide paste) that does not allow the absorption of any UVB radiation. Twenty minutes of sunlight 3 times a week will give you the proper amount of Vitamin D. In the end, if you do not wear sunscreen you are getting more than enough Vitamin D along with too much radiation. Most people do not apply sunscreen to their neck, hands, legs and arms each day. This alone will allow adequate UVB radiation to give you all the Vitamin D you...
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Strategies for “Heart” Health

Since this is February and the month for Valentine’s Day, I thought it appropriate to talk about “Heart Health” Yes, according to the American Heart Association, saturated and trans fats are still targets, and the average American needs to cut saturated fat intake in half. Trans fat, found in many processed snack and convenience foods, poses the greatest heart risk. They are dropping, but still warrants checking nutrition labels to avoid the trans fats. What is the best way to replace saturated fat? Concentrate on polyunsaturated fat (found in nuts, seeds and canola oil). Replace cheese in a salad with almonds or walnuts and switch one meal a week from red meat to fish. Monounsaturated fat (found in olives, olive oil, avocado, and peanuts) another good replacement for saturated fats. Example: replace sour cream with sliced or mashed avocado. Total nutritional quality matters most and the effects on heart health seem most closely tied to the total nutritional quality of the diet, rather than a focus on individual nutrients, such as total fat or carbohydrate intake. To state it simply, eat a healthy diet, don’t smoke, get regular physical activity throughout the week. And you’ll feel better,...
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Twist of Lemon Can Trim Salt

For someone like me, who needs to trim the sodium from their diet, are you aware of the secrets of the lemon? They offer so many ingredients to your kitchen, such as bold arrays of aromas and flavors—-sour, fresh, and zesty. With each squeeze of the lemon or pinch of the zest, you can brighten any savory dish, soup, pasta, salads, baked goods and desserts. It is all done with zero fat and not one grain of sodium (salt), yet the completed dish has so much flavor. Using lemons instead of salt to flavor your dishes can decrease sodium intake of up to 75%. Let’s face it, we all consume way much more sodium than we should and this can lead to poor health in many ways. Did you know that one lemon can yield 2-3 tablespoons of juice and 1 lemon can also yield about 1 tablespoon of zest? Here in California, lemons are very plentiful at this time of year. So, for the next month, lets see how many different recipes we can make, using lemons. Please share yours with this newsletter. Stay...
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