Grape Seed Serum

What do you do with it? The following are some uses for keeping your skin healthy by the addition of Grape Seed Serum:       This super oil is not only a natural antioxidant but is 20X more potent than Vitamin C , 50X more powerful than Vitamin E and more potent in Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids than Olive Oil. It is absorbed quickly into the skin leaving your skin silky smooth and not greasy. It is an anti-inflammatory, so accelerates the healing process and improves blood flow to the skin. The most important use for Grape Seed Serum is as a great moisturizer. It is light and absorbs quickly. Your skin will not feel greasy, simply soft and smooth. Additionally, it is a 100% natural antioxidant and you get 100% efficacy into the...
read more

Toners, Astringents and Fresheners

Toners, astringents and fresheners all fall under the same category. They remove residual traces of dirt, oil, sweat, make up, dead skin cells, bacteria and any excess cleanser from the skin. Toners are designed to restore the pH balance and prepare the skin for additional exfoliators and serums. So often, I have clients who say they do not use a toner, astringent or freshener. They say they do not want to take the time or the step and feel that it is not necessary. As you have read above, it is an important step in the daily skincare...
read more

Did You Know This About Glycerin?

Glycerin is part of the alcohol family (polyols) and functions in many skin care areas including a Denaturant; Fragrance Ingredient; Hair Conditioning Agent; Humectant; Oral Care Agent; Oral Health Care Drug; Skin Conditioning Agent – Humectant; Skin Protectant; Viscosity Decreasing Agent. Its source can be from animals or plants. It is a wonderful lubricant and skin moisturizer with humectant qualities. And, yes, some alcohols are moisturizing. The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines glycerin as any purified commercial product that is comprised of at least 95 percent glycerol (a chemical compound of biological lipids, triglycerides and phospholipids), which are rich nutrients that are craved by the skin. Note that although glycerin and glycerine–with an “e”–are not exactly the same, the terms are often used interchangeably. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also classifies glycerin as a food flavoring (not an additive) that is “generally recognized as safe” and therefore can be used without quantitative restrictions. Glycerine is produced industrially when vegetable oils (especially coconut oil and palm kernel oil) and animal fats are turned into soaps and other products. Glycerine is a common ingredient in cosmetics, toothpaste, drugs, lubricants and other personal-care products because it is a humectant, meaning it helps your skin retain...
read more